4 Reasons Why I Don’t Raw Feed

 

Feeding dogs raw is so trendy right now. And I will admit, I have seen the results of raw fed shine during my time working in the veterinary industry. However, when I weigh the cost-benefit of exclusively raw feeding, it just doesn’t make sense for our family.

 

It’s Time Consuming

I rarely want to cook for myself. My dogs are my children, so I do pamper them more than some people, but on days when I am scooping peanut butter onto a waffle that came out of my freezer to feed myself, you can bet that I won’t be preparing anything for my little babes. That said, when I meal prep, or have some extra energy at the end of the day, they always reap those benefits.

It’s Expensive

I recently left my job and this has left my family a little strapped for cash. We’re not poor, but we are frugal. We cut costs where we can and live well below our means when I am earning money to ease the financial impact when I am not. If by some miracle I have a week where I am inspired to feed raw, I carefully incorporate it into their routine, and they LOVE it, but it is definitely a splurge.

It’s Rude

Have you ever been asked to do something for someone and candidly agree on the assumption that it will be no big deal? Yeah, me too. Well guess what, that something that could have just been, “snuggle my puppies for me, make sure they have water, and give them a couple scoops of food before you leave,” just turned into a much more involved chore. That’s right, say good-bye to guilt-free vacations.

It’s Not That Much Better For Your Dog

This is perhaps the most important factor that I consider in all this, because if it were really as night-and-day as some people claim, I would be on the bandwagon. The fact is, the research just isn’t out there to outright support people’s claims for the benefits of raw feeding. Remember earlier when I said I could see the difference? Well, usually folks who raw feed are the types who naturally put more time into caring for their pups, and it is clear that those people have healthier dogs! That’s what I’m seeing.

 

Brush your dog’s teeth, be intentional about the intensity and kinds of exercise you’re providing for your dog depending on his or her specific breed, look into the kibble you’re feeding, and be conscientious. Your dog will be healthier, and your veterinary technician will be able to see the difference all the same!

 

The Fox

New Year’s Resolutions: 2017, The Year of Self-Study

I am going to start by saying that I don’t normally make New Year’s resolutions. And yes, I know that this is somewhat of a cliche thing to say, but it’s true. I think the last time I made a New Year’s resolution was in Middle School, when we did so as a part of a class activity. It’s not that I don’t believe in the power that setting goals for oneself holds, but I generally subscribe to the idea that I am able to set these all year round, and that I should.

Unfortunately, living our lives in the “shoulds” just doesn’t make for a productive or happy life; and while I do periodically set these goals for myself year round, it just doesn’t always present itself as pertinent all the time. This year I am making a major shift in how I view my self value, and some steps I have already invested in, but I know that it’s easier to stick to specific, measurable goals than vague ones, especially when someone else is helping hold you accountable. Thanks, Erin.

Bearing that in mind, here are my New Year’s resolutions:

  1. I will land the job.
  2. I will not pin an article without having read it.
  3. I will go running at least twice a week.
  4. I will walk my dogs every day I am in the same home as they are.
  5. I will read a new book that broadens my worldview at least once a month.
  6. I will read a scholarly news article everyday.
  7. I will research, or make a note to do so later, anytime I question my knowledge on a topic.
  8. I will take a new Coursera class every month.
  9. I will say no to things I don’t want to do that won’t contribute to my success.

This year I am being intentional and making decisions knowing that I can only spend my resources once, be that time or money.  That means, instead of binging on worthless TV only because I can’t think of anything else to do, I will be realistic and not say I won’t watch TV, but rather that I will only binge on a little TV and only shows that bring me joy. With my newfound extra time I will play with my dogs, go to the gym, or just sit and read quietly. That’s where you find the time to do the things that bring you joy, by eliminating those that either actively detract, or actively distract and leave you feeling neutral. In that vein I have quit my job and stopped even considering applying to anything that won’t bring me joy.

I have made the choice that I am worthwhile, and I am learning my value. I have plenty to bring to the table in a job, and I am tired of working places where people are just there for a paycheck. I understand the need for money is inevitable but, jeez, guys. I want a career, not just a job, where people are excited about what they’re doing. Everyone has bad days, but if I am around people who generally share my enthusiasm, I’ll be alright. I’ve spent enough time being unhappy and unfulfilled.

2017, you will be good to me, whether you like it or not. I will make this year, my year, because I will make it about bettering myself in order to better my circumstances and the world I surround myself with. So here’s to you, 2017: cheers!

The Fox